Common Sense Solutions & Dieting

 

One thing I’d like every woman to understand is the true meaning of diet. I cannot emphasize enough how much potential harm comes from our society’s insistence that diet simply means restricting caloric intake to lose weight.

The current trend in maintaining a healthy weight is the non-diet approach for health, and although I say trend, it is more than just trendy.  It is not like the dozens of fad diets that have had brief popular appeal over the past fifty years that promise quick weight loss and often don’t deliver.

In my book—A Woman’s Guide to Healthy Aging- I look at some of the problems associated with our modern diet and consider some common-sense solutions that can help reduce your health risk for the long haul, I call this the non-diet diet.

The non-diet approach is a more balanced, realistic way to lose weight and maintain good health with nourishing foods, daily physical activity, positive thinking and smart life-style choices. This includes:

  • Making fibre your friend. Fibre keeps our digestive system running smoothly and also keeps us feeling full and satisfied longer.
  • Get cooking! Make healthier versions of your favorite take out—save time by buying pre-cut washed veggies.
  • Eat your fruit and veggies and your leafy greens
  • Boost vitamin B intake: Folate B12 and B6
  • Boost vitamin E intake
  • Add polyphenol-rich foods-brain foods that are powerful anti-oxidants: blackberries cherries plums, walnut halves
  • Reduce your fat intake
  • Increase your Omega 3-fatty acids
  • What your cholesterol
  • Get your daily calcium

Any way we look at it, regardless of our personal inclinations—whether we’re trim or we tip the scale, whether we live to run or we balk at running, whether we sleep like babies or get nothing better than a series of catnaps through the night—nutrition, exercise, and sleep are among the major factors that affect our health.

One very important thing to realize about these factors is that they are within our control.

Sure, other factors beyond our control also affect our health, including family history and genetic inheritance, sex, and age. We cannot modify those, but we can modify how we eat, how active we are, and how well we sleep. And for many of us, some modification is necessary if we want to live a long and healthy life.

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

Top Trends in Preventative Healthcare

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Science and Technology Converge
Part I

As a passionate advocate of preventative healthcare and wellness, I am glad to see that there will be an increased focus on prevention, because many older people continue to have chronic diseases which overwhelm their daily activities and are not enjoying a good quality of life in their later years. It is worth emphasizing that while most of us will face some sort of illness in our later years, it is important to live a healthy lifestyle; get enough exercise, eat a healthy diet, avoid smoking, excessive drinking, sugar, salts and unhealthy fats and processed foods. That way we will cope with illness, aging and any disability in a strong and independent manner.

Advances in technology and science are making it easier for people to focus on preventative healthcare. In order to maintain a healthy lifestyle and for a more health conscious society, let’s look at some of the possibilities and opportunities.

 Wearable Technology will continue to grow! And why do I love it?

It seems we need to quantify every step, every workout, every morsel of food and every waking and sleeping minute of the day and as a result there is an ever-expanding range of technologies to support our need to chronicle our daily lives. Interest in mobile apps such as activity trackers like Fitbit will continue to capture consumer interest. According to a report by international consulting firm, PwC, “Adoption of health-related smartphone apps doubled in two years, from 16 percent in 2013 to 32 percent in 2014 and will continue. There are many fitness and activity trackers on the market today, it can be confusing.   PcMagazine, has an excellent article comparing various trackers and recommends you try them out before you buy. Once you’ve bought a fitness tracker, the next step is to integrate it into your daily routine, which I recently wrote about. “You’ve bought a fitness tracker—Now what!

What has worked for me is the challenge of maintaining my commitment by using my Fitbit, trying really hard to maintain that 10,000.00 steps per day. I appreciate a measurable outcome. And yup, I have learned once again, that “hectic does NOT equal aerobic”.

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

PAP TESTS HELP ELIMINATE CERVICAL CANCER IN CANADA

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Every year there are 400,000 Canadian women who receive news that their Pap test results are not normal. The voice of women physicians, The Federation of Medical Women of Canada (www.fmwc.ca) wants to change that. This month they are launching an awareness campaign aimed at physicians to urge their female patients to have a PAP test. #endcancer
Cervical cancer is the 4th most common reproductive cancer in Canadian women today.
This year, 1500 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and sadly 380 women will die. Cervical cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in the cells of the cervix. Malignant means that it can spread, or metastasize, to other parts of the body. Cells in the cervix sometimes change and no longer grow or behave normally. Changes to cells of the cervix can also cause precancerous conditions. This means that these cells are not yet cancer, but there is a chance that these abnormal cells might become cancerous if not treated. Most women with precancerous changes of the cervix are successfully treated and don’t develop cancer. *
Cervical Cancer is Preventable!
Most cervical cancers are diagnosed in women who have never been screened or have not been screened regularly. Screening is the only way to detect the early changes that might lead to cervical cancer.  I can’t emphasize enough how important is to have a PAP test. In Ontario PAP tests are recommended at the age of 21, if the individual has ever been sexually active. If the test is normal, then screening should be done every three years.
HPV and Cervical Cancer can be prevented with vaccines.
Another way to protect against cancer is to get vaccinated against HPV, the Human Papillomavirus. It is the most common sexually transmitted infection with more than 40 types of HPV contracted through sexual intercourse, genital skin-to-skin contact and oral sex. They can infect the genital areas of men and women, including the penis, vulva, vagina, cervix, rectum and anus.
There are millions of women in Canada who still do not get regular PAP tests and/or a HPV vaccination.We are fortunate in Canada to have access to government-funded healthcare. Prevention is the best way to reduce your chances of facing a serious illness.

TO FIND A CLINIC NEAR YOU GO TO:
Find a Medisys Clinic

 

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

New Intrauterine System (IUS) – Advances the IUD Concept

shutterstock_174197693.jpgMore Choices Available for Long Acting Birth Control
Perhaps you may remember the IUD or the Copper T that was first introduced in the 1980’s. Now there’s a new birth control device called IUS or Intrauterine System. Like the IUD (Intrauterine Device) it’s placed in the uterus and made of soft flexible plastic in the shape of a T, only its smaller than the IUD’s of the past and releases a small daily amount of progestin hormone. The hormone thins out the lining of the uterus making implantation of a fertilized egg more difficult. The T shape makes it difficult for sperm to move through the womb to reach an egg.
For those that don’t want to think of birth control on a daily basis, the IUS could be an ideal solution. The hormonal IUS is a long-acting contraceptive method. It works for five years or three years, depending on the type and is approximately 99% effective in preventing pregnancy. It is also a non-permanent form of birth control, meaning you can have it removed at any time by your healthcare provider and try to become pregnant right away. It may also provide for lighter periods

The CHOICE Project Research Findings –IUS Lowers rate of unwanted pregnancies
In a recent research project, the IUS was provided at no cost to teens as part of The CHOICE Project in the United States. The teen pregnancy and abortion rates were reduced dramatically; the teen pregnancy rate was 34.0 per 1,000 teens compared to the national average of 158.5 per 1,000 teens. Additionally, the abortion rate for teens in the CHOICE project was 9.7 per 1,000 teens compared to the national average of 41.5 per 1,000 teens.
Birth control is a personal choice. It is important to choose a method that fits your life. What is right for one woman may not be right for another. Sometimes that can be overwhelming and as always I would suggest you consult a health care professional to discuss your options.

#birthcontrol #choice #women #health

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage

Top ways to protect prevent skin cancer

shutterstock_564313852.jpgSkin Cancer in Canada is on the rise While the rate of new cancer cases and death rates for many types of cancers are going down, Melanoma or –skin cancer- is on the rise.   It is the most common cancer in Canada affecting one in five people today. A tan especially among young people is associated with attractiveness and looking healthy, but there is no such thing as a healthy tan. Using tanning beds and getting sun burnt in childhood and |Some alarming facts from the Canadian Cancer Society

  • Melanoma is the most common and deadliest forms of cancer in young people between the ages of 15 and 29.
  • Using a tanning bed before the age of thirty-five increases your risk of developing skin cancer by 75 per cent.
  • UV rays from tanning beds can be five times stronger than the mid-day summer sun.
  • Tanned skin is damaged skin. Even when the tan fades, the damage is still there.While it’s wonderful to feel the warmth of the summer sun and enjoy the outdoors sun there are also risks. Here are a few ways to protect you from the Skin Cancer Foundation
  • The sun is most intense between 10 AM and 4 PM –so seek the shade between those hours.
  • Do not burn.
  • Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  • Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating.
  • Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens can be used on babies if needed, over the age of six months.
  • Examine your skin head-to-toe every month.
  • See your physician every year for a professional skin exam.
  • If you are a beach goer, remember the intensity of sun exposure is elevated. Both water and sand can reflect up to 80 percent of the sun’s rays, however, beach and pool activities can be enjoyed safely as long as people take some extra precautions if f you use plenty of sunscreen
  • For effective ultraviolent A (UVA) radiation protection, select products that have some combination of the following ingredients: avobenzone, ecamsule (a.k.a. MexorylTM), oxybenzone, titanium dioxide and zinc oxide.

Everyday sun exposure counts…Sun Protection is year round While we mostly think about protecting ourselves against the sun during the summer months, protection should be year round to reduce your lifetime sun exposure. So make putting on sunscreen a daily habit.

#sun #suntan #summer #healthy #skincancer

Disclaimer The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without

How to stay healthy and vital over 65

shutterstock_146561927.jpgResearch shows that people are living longer. Today a man who is currently 65 can expect to live another 17.4 years, a woman, 20.8 years*. Whether you are edging towards sixty-five or beyond or have parents that are aging, modifying risks will increase your chances of staying healthy and vital as you age. We know that physiological changes occur as we age, but there are areas of health that can be modified and will improve your health and reduce your risks for physical and mental disabilities.
There are both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that affect healthy aging. The non-modifiable risks includes aging, gender and genetics. The major modifiable risks that we can change include an unhealthy diet, inactivity and tobacco.


The most recent research on diet, points to an increase in diagnosed diabetes to almost 2. 4 million Canadians by 2016. While almost 40% of Canadian adults are classified as having high blood cholesterol levels. You can help reduce your risk by eating a balanced diet that reduces total fat intake, controls weight, with limits to alcohol and caffeine. Studies show that there is no best diet among the most popular high profile diets, but that the best diet is the one you adhere to.   I would suggest using the Canada Food Guide to Healthy Eating as your roadmap.
Obviously much has been said about tobacco and its proven links to cancer. Quitting smoking is non-negotiable. It will make a big difference in your long term health and ability to engage in an active lifestyle.
Diet and exercise go hand in hand. Being active most days and exercising with purpose is essential. This means, focusing on exercise as an activity itself, walking to do an errand is always good, but exercising with the single purpose of Increasing aerobic capacity is more effective.   Exercise can be categorized as Light activity – 1 hour a day, moderate activity – 30-60 min a day, and vigorous activity – 20-30 min a day.
You may wish to mix and match your activities, varying your level depending on your time, your energy and your circumstances. As always consult a healthcare professional before starting an exercise program. Exercise is an important ingredient to staying active and healthy. Exercise is also the single most important activity people can do to reduce the risk of age-related brain decline.
Here are a few other suggestions.   Check your vaccination records to ensure they are up to date for vaccinations such as tetanus.   Get a flu shot every year, and over sixty-five, a pneumococcal vaccination. Anyone over fifty? Consider getting the shingles vaccine as shingles, the disease increases with age.
And finally, you need to stay socially connected to remain vibrant, healthy and active. So whether you are working or retired, enjoy your interactions, your commitments, your interests and stay connected, learning new things on a daily basis!!

* Statistics Canada 2005

#healthy #happy #over65 #livelong #

DISCLAIMER
The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content. However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider. As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

Brain Drain and Menopause: Reality or Myth ?

shutterstock_57740512Is there such a thing as Brain Drain and Menopause?
Research shows that the female sex hormone, estrogen, plays a key role in brain function. Estrogen declines during menopause, but that doesn’t mean your brain function will decline along with it. Although estrogen produced by our bodies helps the brain function, there’s no clear clinical evidence to support the notion that the brains of women after menopause don’t work as well as they did in the past.  What we are learning is the difference between changes with menopause and normal age-related changes in function.
Often, postmenopausal women do have memory slips or difficulty concentrating. However, research suggests a variety of potential underlying causes. These include disturbed sleep, extra stress, or depression. If you’re awakened by night sweats several times during the night, that’s often enough to interfere with your ability to concentrate or remember details for the next days’ meeting.

Should hot flashes be the reason for your insomnia and the fuzzy thinking and memory glitches that follow a sleepless night, try reducing their hold on you with some lifestyle changes. Exercising daily is linked to a lower incidence of hot flashes. And some products designed to lower your temperature, such as the menopod, may be helpful. And if you’re a smoker, this may be the motivation you need to finally quit: Women who smoke have more intense and more frequent hot flashes than nonsmoking women.
If you think you might be depressed, which can cause difficulty concentrating, make an appointment with your doctor. Menopausal hormone fluctuations can be linked to depression in some women. Feeling occasional sadness isn’t the same as being depressed.
If your stress level is noticeably high, you may be able to control and reframe your intensity by practicing some form of relaxation. One of the simplest ways to combat stress is deep breathing. Meditation, yoga, tai chi, or gentle stretching are also good ways to reduce stress. If stress, memory slips, or other menopausal symptoms continue to bother you, consult your doctor. The key is to take action that will let you feel more in control.
Now what was I saying?

#woman #brainhealth #healthy #menopause

Chilling hot flashes? You might want to check out the Menopod. (www.menopod.com)- It contains a cooling technology inside the device. There are no fans or moving parts. When you turn the power on, it instantly drops to a cool temperature) so that you can discreetly place it on the back of your neck to stop the hot flash.

 Disclaimer
The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.