PAP TESTS HELP ELIMINATE CERVICAL CANCER IN CANADA

shutterstock_221885935.jpg

Every year there are 400,000 Canadian women who receive news that their Pap test results are not normal. The voice of women physicians, The Federation of Medical Women of Canada (www.fmwc.ca) wants to change that. This month they are launching an awareness campaign aimed at physicians to urge their female patients to have a PAP test. #endcancer
Cervical cancer is the 4th most common reproductive cancer in Canadian women today.
This year, 1500 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and sadly 380 women will die. Cervical cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in the cells of the cervix. Malignant means that it can spread, or metastasize, to other parts of the body. Cells in the cervix sometimes change and no longer grow or behave normally. Changes to cells of the cervix can also cause precancerous conditions. This means that these cells are not yet cancer, but there is a chance that these abnormal cells might become cancerous if not treated. Most women with precancerous changes of the cervix are successfully treated and don’t develop cancer. *
Cervical Cancer is Preventable!
Most cervical cancers are diagnosed in women who have never been screened or have not been screened regularly. Screening is the only way to detect the early changes that might lead to cervical cancer.  I can’t emphasize enough how important is to have a PAP test. In Ontario PAP tests are recommended at the age of 21, if the individual has ever been sexually active. If the test is normal, then screening should be done every three years.
HPV and Cervical Cancer can be prevented with vaccines.
Another way to protect against cancer is to get vaccinated against HPV, the Human Papillomavirus. It is the most common sexually transmitted infection with more than 40 types of HPV contracted through sexual intercourse, genital skin-to-skin contact and oral sex. They can infect the genital areas of men and women, including the penis, vulva, vagina, cervix, rectum and anus.
There are millions of women in Canada who still do not get regular PAP tests and/or a HPV vaccination.We are fortunate in Canada to have access to government-funded healthcare. Prevention is the best way to reduce your chances of facing a serious illness.

TO FIND A CLINIC NEAR YOU GO TO:
Find a Medisys Clinic

 

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

So You’ve Bought a Fitness Tracker— Now What?

shutterstock_593935241You’ve finally decided to get into shape, need more motivation or just want another ‘toy’ to add to your growing list of fitness gizmos. So you begin to check out fitness devices. I started on-line and then decided to go to one of the big box stores to take a closer look. There are now so many of them on the market it can be daunting.
I was amazed at the variety of fitness trackers or ‘wearable technology ‘ as they’ re called on display. There are even trackers for pets and ones that will critique your tennis swing! I was totally lost. But quick relief, my daughter went online and bought me one!!! Whew, decision made.

So the first step is to decide what you want to track?
Steps, calories, heart rate, fitness activities besides walking or running or a combination of some or all, you can even measure the amount of sleep and awake time. Do you want one to wear on your wrist or discreetly on your person—in your pocket or attached to your bra?
Once you’ve made the choice the next step is to wear it for the first week—if you don’t regularly exercise then just wear it for a week to decide what you normally do –that would be your baseline.
Now that you know your starting point, it’s time to get moving.
Set a reasonable goal. Your fitness device might have a default goal — often 10,000 steps a day. From your baseline add 200-300 steps a day to increase your weekly total by 2,000. That’s an increase of about a mile a day. Keep building up until you get to 10,000.
When you look at calories burned, a reasonable goal is to increase by 250 calories a day. You can get that from 30 minutes of mild to moderate exercise. Or you could burn that amount doing some extra moving during the day. Grocery shopping for instance burns about 100 calories an hour for a 175-pound person.
Remember, to lose 1 pound a week, you need to create a 500-calorie deficit each day. The best way to do this is by eating a little less and moving a little more.
Pay attention to how you feel. On a day when you walk 1,000 more steps than usual, you may notice you feel great and want to do it again the next day.
Transform wasted time into steps. Once you’re aware of your steps, the most boring parts of your day become opportunities. On hold with customer service? Pace your house. Waiting to pick up your kids from school, arrive a bit early and go for a walk. Take the stairs when you can instead of the elevator.
Healthy aging can begin with baby steps! And as always, it is one step at a time!

#run #fitness #active #healthy

Disclaimer
The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

New Intrauterine System (IUS) – Advances the IUD Concept

shutterstock_174197693.jpgMore Choices Available for Long Acting Birth Control
Perhaps you may remember the IUD or the Copper T that was first introduced in the 1980’s. Now there’s a new birth control device called IUS or Intrauterine System. Like the IUD (Intrauterine Device) it’s placed in the uterus and made of soft flexible plastic in the shape of a T, only its smaller than the IUD’s of the past and releases a small daily amount of progestin hormone. The hormone thins out the lining of the uterus making implantation of a fertilized egg more difficult. The T shape makes it difficult for sperm to move through the womb to reach an egg.
For those that don’t want to think of birth control on a daily basis, the IUS could be an ideal solution. The hormonal IUS is a long-acting contraceptive method. It works for five years or three years, depending on the type and is approximately 99% effective in preventing pregnancy. It is also a non-permanent form of birth control, meaning you can have it removed at any time by your healthcare provider and try to become pregnant right away. It may also provide for lighter periods

The CHOICE Project Research Findings –IUS Lowers rate of unwanted pregnancies
In a recent research project, the IUS was provided at no cost to teens as part of The CHOICE Project in the United States. The teen pregnancy and abortion rates were reduced dramatically; the teen pregnancy rate was 34.0 per 1,000 teens compared to the national average of 158.5 per 1,000 teens. Additionally, the abortion rate for teens in the CHOICE project was 9.7 per 1,000 teens compared to the national average of 41.5 per 1,000 teens.
Birth control is a personal choice. It is important to choose a method that fits your life. What is right for one woman may not be right for another. Sometimes that can be overwhelming and as always I would suggest you consult a health care professional to discuss your options.

#birthcontrol #choice #women #health

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage

Top ways to protect prevent skin cancer

shutterstock_564313852.jpgSkin Cancer in Canada is on the rise While the rate of new cancer cases and death rates for many types of cancers are going down, Melanoma or –skin cancer- is on the rise.   It is the most common cancer in Canada affecting one in five people today. A tan especially among young people is associated with attractiveness and looking healthy, but there is no such thing as a healthy tan. Using tanning beds and getting sun burnt in childhood and |Some alarming facts from the Canadian Cancer Society

  • Melanoma is the most common and deadliest forms of cancer in young people between the ages of 15 and 29.
  • Using a tanning bed before the age of thirty-five increases your risk of developing skin cancer by 75 per cent.
  • UV rays from tanning beds can be five times stronger than the mid-day summer sun.
  • Tanned skin is damaged skin. Even when the tan fades, the damage is still there.While it’s wonderful to feel the warmth of the summer sun and enjoy the outdoors sun there are also risks. Here are a few ways to protect you from the Skin Cancer Foundation
  • The sun is most intense between 10 AM and 4 PM –so seek the shade between those hours.
  • Do not burn.
  • Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  • Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating.
  • Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens can be used on babies if needed, over the age of six months.
  • Examine your skin head-to-toe every month.
  • See your physician every year for a professional skin exam.
  • If you are a beach goer, remember the intensity of sun exposure is elevated. Both water and sand can reflect up to 80 percent of the sun’s rays, however, beach and pool activities can be enjoyed safely as long as people take some extra precautions if f you use plenty of sunscreen
  • For effective ultraviolent A (UVA) radiation protection, select products that have some combination of the following ingredients: avobenzone, ecamsule (a.k.a. MexorylTM), oxybenzone, titanium dioxide and zinc oxide.

Everyday sun exposure counts…Sun Protection is year round While we mostly think about protecting ourselves against the sun during the summer months, protection should be year round to reduce your lifetime sun exposure. So make putting on sunscreen a daily habit.

#sun #suntan #summer #healthy #skincancer

Disclaimer The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without

How to stay healthy and vital over 65

shutterstock_146561927.jpgResearch shows that people are living longer. Today a man who is currently 65 can expect to live another 17.4 years, a woman, 20.8 years*. Whether you are edging towards sixty-five or beyond or have parents that are aging, modifying risks will increase your chances of staying healthy and vital as you age. We know that physiological changes occur as we age, but there are areas of health that can be modified and will improve your health and reduce your risks for physical and mental disabilities.
There are both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that affect healthy aging. The non-modifiable risks includes aging, gender and genetics. The major modifiable risks that we can change include an unhealthy diet, inactivity and tobacco.


The most recent research on diet, points to an increase in diagnosed diabetes to almost 2. 4 million Canadians by 2016. While almost 40% of Canadian adults are classified as having high blood cholesterol levels. You can help reduce your risk by eating a balanced diet that reduces total fat intake, controls weight, with limits to alcohol and caffeine. Studies show that there is no best diet among the most popular high profile diets, but that the best diet is the one you adhere to.   I would suggest using the Canada Food Guide to Healthy Eating as your roadmap.
Obviously much has been said about tobacco and its proven links to cancer. Quitting smoking is non-negotiable. It will make a big difference in your long term health and ability to engage in an active lifestyle.
Diet and exercise go hand in hand. Being active most days and exercising with purpose is essential. This means, focusing on exercise as an activity itself, walking to do an errand is always good, but exercising with the single purpose of Increasing aerobic capacity is more effective.   Exercise can be categorized as Light activity – 1 hour a day, moderate activity – 30-60 min a day, and vigorous activity – 20-30 min a day.
You may wish to mix and match your activities, varying your level depending on your time, your energy and your circumstances. As always consult a healthcare professional before starting an exercise program. Exercise is an important ingredient to staying active and healthy. Exercise is also the single most important activity people can do to reduce the risk of age-related brain decline.
Here are a few other suggestions.   Check your vaccination records to ensure they are up to date for vaccinations such as tetanus.   Get a flu shot every year, and over sixty-five, a pneumococcal vaccination. Anyone over fifty? Consider getting the shingles vaccine as shingles, the disease increases with age.
And finally, you need to stay socially connected to remain vibrant, healthy and active. So whether you are working or retired, enjoy your interactions, your commitments, your interests and stay connected, learning new things on a daily basis!!

* Statistics Canada 2005

#healthy #happy #over65 #livelong #

DISCLAIMER
The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content. However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider. As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

CAFFEINE-THE UPS AND DOWNS. HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH?

shutterstock_433348924 (1)Millions of us rely on coffee to wake us up, keep us going and improve concentration and focus. But how much is too much and what is the difference between caffeine and coffee. Caffeine is a naturally occurring chemical found in more than 60 plants including coffee beans, tea leaves, kola nuts and as we know used to flavour soft drink colas. It is also found in cacao pods used to make chocolate products. Man-made caffeine is sometimes added to foods, drinks and medicines. So caffeine is not just found in coffee.
Up to 400 milligrams of caffeine a day appears to be safe for most healthy adults.
That’s roughly the amount of caffeine in four cups of brewed coffee. For children, 100 milligrams a day is the most a child should be allowed, although I would not recommend that children drink coffee.
Caffeine and Medications
Heavy caffeine use among adults can cause unpleasant side effects and may not be a good choice for people who are highly sensitive to its effects or take certain medications.
For instance, caffeine is used in painkillers such as aspirin and acetaminophen and for simple headaches. It’s also used in drugs such as 222’s because caffeine helps absorb the codeine – so certain medications include caffeine.
Some people are more sensitive to caffeine than are others. If you’re susceptible to the effects of caffeine, just small amounts — even one cup of coffee or tea — may prompt unwanted effects, such as restlessness and sleep problems. Here are some of the side effects. How you react to caffeine may be determined in part by how much caffeine you’re used to drinking. People who don’t regularly drink caffeine tend to be more sensitive to its negative effects. Other factors may include body mass, age, medication use and health conditions such as anxiety disorders. Research also suggests that men may be more susceptible to the effects of caffeine than are women.

  • Nervousness
  • Restlessness
  • Irritability
  • Stomach upset
  • Fast Heartbeat
  • Insomnia

So I would say yes to a cup or two but no to a pot!

 #coffee #caffeine #healthy #breakfast 

DISCLAIMER
T
he material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

Travel alerts internationally for polio and measles outbreaks this summer. Check your vaccinations before traveling

shutterstock_155497571.jpg

Travel alerts for polio worldwide & the resurgence of measles outbreaks in Canada, Europe and Africa, highlight the need for Canadians to get vaccinated before traveling to affected areas. Measles is a virus that can affect anyone and is highly contagious for individuals that have not previously had measles, or have not been vaccinated.

As long as measles is affecting children in other parts of the world, Canada will be affected as well. That’s why it’s extremely important for parents to ensure their children are vaccinated twice. Once when they are 12-15 months old, and again when they are 4-6 years old. Adults born before 1970 are likely immune, and everyone else needs to check their records. Polio, which has been eliminated from most countries, continues to occur in some areas of the world. The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends that travelers get vaccinated against polio when going to countries where polio has not been eliminated: Pakistan, Afghanistan, Nigeria, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Syria, and Iraq.  As for polio, our travel clinics have been busy answering questions from travelers about getting the vaccine even when not travelling in affected areas.  My advice is to have one shot for polio, called IPV as an adult, if you have not already done so.
Measles is a respiratory disease caused by a virus of the same name. It causes fever, runny nose and a characteristic rash all over the body. Most people recover, but the infection is fatal between one and three of every 1,000 cases. Polio is a contagious disease. It is spread from person to person through contaminated food and water. Polio can attack the central nervous system and destroy the nerve cells that activate muscles, which may cause paralysis and death.
So please check your vaccinations before travelling this summer.

#travel #summer #healthy

Disclaimer
The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

 

Understanding cholestrol-the good, the bad, and the guidelines

shutterstock_351078725Heart disease is the number one cause of death in Canada, which makes prevention of heart disease so important. Some risk factors for heart disease unfortunately cannot be changed, including your genes, gender and ethnicity. There are many other factors, however, that you can control. These are called modifiable risk factors, and include high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, diet, exercise levels, and high cholesterol. But what level of cholesterol is considered to be high, and how does your doctor determine whether or not cholesterol-lowering medication is right for you?

You may have heard of “good” cholesterol and “bad” cholesterol. Good cholesterol is called HDL and bad cholesterol is LDL. LDL cholesterol is used as the primary target when deciding whether your cholesterol is at target or not. Target cholesterol levels differ according to risk category; if you are a low-risk individual, we accept higher LDL levels than we do for high-risk individuals. So the first step that your doctor takes when assessing your cholesterol profile is determination of your risk category. This is done by calculating what’s called a Framingham Risk Score, which takes into account your age, gender, total and HDL cholesterol levels, smoking status, blood pressure, family history, and whether or not you have diabetes.

A Framingham Risk Score of less than 10% is considered low-risk, and for these individuals an LDL level of less than 5.0 is considered acceptable. Individuals with a risk score of less than 5% can have their cholesterol rechecked in 3-5 years, while those with a risk score of 5-9% should have their cholesterol levels repeated yearly. Framingham Risk Scores between 10 and 19% fall into the moderate-risk category. The target LDL level for moderate-risk individuals is <3.5. Levels greater than 3.5 should be treated with cholesterol-lowering medication. However, cholesterol-lowering medication will also be recommended if your LDL is less than 3.5, but a different marker called non-HDL is elevated. Finally, Framingham Risk Scores of 20% or greater are considered high-risk. Treatment with cholesterol-lowering medications will be considered for all high-risk patients, regardless of LDL cholesterol levels.

Your doctor will discuss the specifics of cholesterol-lowering medication with you if it is indicated based on these guidelines. For some individuals, lifestyle modification can be tried before medication in order to help lower cholesterol levels. For others, however, medication may be required at the outset depending on risk level and degree of elevation of cholesterol levels. Whether you require cholesterol-lowering medication or not, everyone should try to implement the Canadian Cardiovascular Society’s recommendations for a heart-healthy lifestyle:

1.    Diet with reduced saturated fats and refined sugars
2.   
Weight reduction and maintenance
3.   Exercise: 150 mins/week of moderate activity (i.e. brisk walking, biking, swimming, etc.
4.   Quit Smoking
5.   Limit alcohol to no more than 1-2 drinks/dayTo learn more about dietary fats from the Heart & Stroke Foundation, click here: http://www.heartandstroke.on.ca/site/c.pvI3IeNWJwE/b.3581947/k.D7AE/Healthy_Living__Dietary_fats_oils_and__cholesterol.htm

 

 

 

Personalized Medicine –When should you consider genetic testing?

cropped-dr-brown.jpgSince the Human Genome project made it possible to map the entire DNA of a human in the 1990’s, it has become a powerful information tool. Learning an individual’s personal genetic make up can lead to improved diagnosis of certain illnesses. We also can advise you, if you are at higher risk because of a disease or condition that runs in your family.  It can help physicians like me make more informed decisions when prescribing medicines.  It is truly miraculous and a continually emerging and exciting field.


Breast cancer, heart disease, type II diabetes, prostate cancer are just a few of the diseases and conditions that can be tested. However, before you begin the process, I would suggest you discuss your concerns with a qualified genetic counselor.  And that counselor should be certified by the Canadian Association of Genetic Counselors. (
www.cagc-accg.ca)


Sometimes, the first and only step you may need to take, is knowing your family history for a medical condition to be flagged with your counselor.
 For instance, the vast majority of breast cancer cases occur by chance and are not as the result of genetic factors.  Genetic counseling can be incredibly reassuring. Although rare, inherited changes in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which was the case for actress Angelina Jolie, are linked to a high lifetime risk of breast, ovarian and other specific cancers.  In that case, preventative measures were taken.  And that too is reassuring.


Once you and your counselor decide genetic testing is right for you, all that is needed is a saliva sample to begin the process. In a future blog, I will discuss genetic testing and medication responses. We are learning how genetic testing can help in prescribing the best medication to treat a condition or disease. And we can tailor medication to specifically treat an individual…. for we all know, it is NOT one size fits all.

 

 

Losing weight the successful way

shutterstock_541208512.jpg

As a family physician, I am often asked, what is the best diet to lose weight. The answer is that all of the well known popular diets whether it’s low fat, low-carb or high fiber is all pretty similar.  The most important part is not the diet or weight loss plan you choose, but sticking to it.  We have a hard time over a sustained period of time staying motivated and following a plan.  Ashley Grachnik, RD, CDE, a Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator recommends these five strategies to lose weight successfully.

Losing Weight – the Successful Way

How do I lose weight and actually keep it off this time?” 

As a Registered Dietitian focusing on Diabetes prevention and management I get this question
all the time.  I see patients who have tried every diet and weight loss trick in the book.  Most of the time they are able to lose some weight but eventually, and inevitably it seems, the weight creeps back on.  This usually happens because of extreme short term changes like cutting outentire food groups which are not sustainable in the long run.  Most people know they should be eating balanced, healthy meals but they don’t always
recognize other behaviour changes that can help with long term success.  So here are my suggestions for healthy eating and changing food behaviours, not dieting.  Healthy eating nourishes the body, prevents diseases and keeps you at a healthy body weight while healthy food behaviours set you up for
success.  You want long term success? Read on…

  1. Change your relationship with food

Food is not your friend or your enemy.  Food should not comfort you when you’re sad, relieve your stress when it’s been a tough day or reward you when you’ve done something good.  Food is your body’s nourishment, just like air and water.  So what does your body really need to be sustained? – Healthy carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamins and minerals.  When you’re emotional – sad, happy, stressed, angry, tired – find something else to do about it that doesn’t involve the kitchen or the drive thru.  I know this is easier said than done but starting to identify those times when you turn to food as emotional comfort or reward is the first step to changing your relationship with food.  To help you, write down a list of all the things you enjoy doing that doesn’t involve food.  Put that list on the fridge or cabinet and when you’re about to reach for food that list is in your face reminding you to turn around and try something else other than eating.

  1. Find support

Changing your habits is difficult but it’s easier when you have people in your corner cheering you on.  You don’t need the food police, that is not supportive, you need friends or family who will encourage you through your journey without judging your setbacks.  And there will be set backs.  If you’re not comfortable talking to your friends or family I suggest turning to the online community.  I’m not talking about joining a diet club online as you might get a lot of misinformation about what healthy eating really means.  I’m mean a chat room or blog about the challenges you face trying to eat healthy and stay on track.  So many people around you are trying to do the same thing as you and you can easily support each other through the tough hurdles of healthy eating and weight loss.

  1. There is no such thing as will power

I truly believe that will power doesn’t exist.  Or if it does it is finite and runs out way too quickly.  So rather than have all sorts of temptations easily accessible to the point you have to fight with yourself NOT to give in, why not set yourself up for success?  Create an environment where you don’t have to fight, where all your choices are easy and healthy.  That means there is no ice cream in the freezer, chips in the cabinet, or pop in the fridge.  When you open anything in your kitchen it is healthy.  Involve your family too – make the house a haven for health and everyone at home will reap the benefits.

Another challenge against “will power” is eating out.  If you’re going to someone’s house for dinner bring a salad, veggie platter or fruit salad so you know at least one option will be healthy.  Don’t go to an all you can eat buffet.  Choose, instead, to go to a restaurant where you know there are healthy choices on the menu or you can ask for healthy substitutions.  Study the menu online or call ahead before you go to ask questions about how dishes are prepared and what kinds of substitutions are possible.  Bottom line: healthy choices are only as hard as you make them.

  1. Enjoy a treat every once in a while!

If it’s your birthday, have some birthday cake.  If you’re at a wedding, have some wedding cake.  Don’t be that person who is on a diet so you can’t ever eat anything unhealthy until you’ve reached your weight goal so you can completely fall off the wagon and indulge in excess.  Allow yourself little treats now and then.  If you’ve been eating healthy and exercising then there is nothing to feel guilty about when you treat yourself to some birthday cake.  Notice I’m using the word “treat” and not “cheat” – this goes back to point number 1 and having a healthy relationship with food.  If you consider food just what it is, then a treat now and then isn’t a negative.  Relax and enjoy and don’t feel guilty.  And if you really want to ensure a little treat won’t be a big set back for you then plan some extra exercise that day before or after the birthday party or wedding.

  1. Make your health your number 1 priority

Yes, healthy living (eating and activity) takes time and planning.  Far too often the excuse for running to a drive thru or skipping the gym is that you just didn’t have time.  If you don’t make time for your health now, you’re going to have to make time for illness later.  And health is a much better thing to make time for.  So re-prioritize.  Take a careful look at everything you do in the day and shift around the importance.  Grocery shopping for healthy food, time to cook and prepare healthy food, and time for some physical activity should be top on the list.  If you find time to sit in front of the TV or computer at all in the day, those activities should move lower than your health on the priority list.  Or if you’re too tired at the end of the day then take a good look at what you do in the beginning of the day and move your health to the start.  No better time to focus on your health then today, so what are you going to do today that is healthy?