Healthy Aging: The NON-DIET SOLUTION

One of the areas that truly impacts aging is weight. Having a reasonable body mass index is a marker for predicting how well one will do in the next 10 years. And we know that summertime – a time of barbecues, drinking, sharing meals with friends and family and vacations – is an easy time to overindulge.

Dieting is defined as restricting oneself to small amounts of food, in order to lose weight. An estimated 45-million Americans spend $33 billion a year trying to lose those extra pounds. Yet, as many of us have experienced, the weight will almost inevitably come back and the whole cycle of food deprivation will begin again.

So the question is: if diets don’t always work, what does? The answer is to turn to a more balanced, realistic approach to losing weight and maintaining good health with nourishing foods, daily physical activity, positive thinking and smart lifestyle choices.

The not dieting trend was confirmed in a 2013 study produced by the NPD Group, an American research organization, which found that people were dieting less and that women were showing the biggest decline in dieting. According to the report, “In the past 10 years, the percentage of women on a diet has dropped by about 10 points. In 1992, 34 per cent of women told NPD they were on a diet; and in 2012, 23 per cent of women reported being on a diet.”

Contrast this with the fact that 57 per cent of adults said that they would like to lose 20 pounds and almost half said they need to change their diet to improve their health.

According to the NPD report:

• 55 per cent said eating healthy includes adding to, and taking out of, their diet;

• 25 per cent said “adding something to the diet” is healthy;

• 19 per cent said “taking something out” of the diet is healthy;

• 72 per cent said they eat reduced-fat foods;

• nearly 45 per cent eat foods with whole grains on a regular basis; and

• 24 per cent include organic foods and beverages in their diet.

Notice that there is no mention of restricting foods as a way to lose weight. So instead of dieting by depriving yourself of food, which usually is a joyless endeavour, try practicing the 80/20 rule: 80 per cent of the time, focus on eating clean, healthy foods; and 20 per cent of the time, you have the freedom to indulge as you please. This means that you don’t have to cut out all treats, you just have to be smart about it 80 per cent of the time.

READ: LESSONS FROM OUR MOTHERS

Research into the impact of diet and brain health confirmed this proposal. Researchers looking at the effects of the MIND diet – which basically entails eating lots of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, some low-fat proteins and either grapes or a glass of wine per day – confirmed that even if you follow this diet most of the time, but not all of the time, it has a significant impact on brain health.

And that makes good sense. None of us can be perfect all the time. But we can make the effort to eat healthy, live healthy and make healthy choices 80 per cent of the time. 

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

Common Sense Solutions & Dieting

 

One thing I’d like every woman to understand is the true meaning of diet. I cannot emphasize enough how much potential harm comes from our society’s insistence that diet simply means restricting caloric intake to lose weight.

The current trend in maintaining a healthy weight is the non-diet approach for health, and although I say trend, it is more than just trendy.  It is not like the dozens of fad diets that have had brief popular appeal over the past fifty years that promise quick weight loss and often don’t deliver.

In my book—A Woman’s Guide to Healthy Aging- I look at some of the problems associated with our modern diet and consider some common-sense solutions that can help reduce your health risk for the long haul, I call this the non-diet diet.

The non-diet approach is a more balanced, realistic way to lose weight and maintain good health with nourishing foods, daily physical activity, positive thinking and smart life-style choices. This includes:

  • Making fibre your friend. Fibre keeps our digestive system running smoothly and also keeps us feeling full and satisfied longer.
  • Get cooking! Make healthier versions of your favorite take out—save time by buying pre-cut washed veggies.
  • Eat your fruit and veggies and your leafy greens
  • Boost vitamin B intake: Folate B12 and B6
  • Boost vitamin E intake
  • Add polyphenol-rich foods-brain foods that are powerful anti-oxidants: blackberries cherries plums, walnut halves
  • Reduce your fat intake
  • Increase your Omega 3-fatty acids
  • What your cholesterol
  • Get your daily calcium

Any way we look at it, regardless of our personal inclinations—whether we’re trim or we tip the scale, whether we live to run or we balk at running, whether we sleep like babies or get nothing better than a series of catnaps through the night—nutrition, exercise, and sleep are among the major factors that affect our health.

One very important thing to realize about these factors is that they are within our control.

Sure, other factors beyond our control also affect our health, including family history and genetic inheritance, sex, and age. We cannot modify those, but we can modify how we eat, how active we are, and how well we sleep. And for many of us, some modification is necessary if we want to live a long and healthy life.

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.