Common Sense Solutions & Dieting

 

One thing I’d like every woman to understand is the true meaning of diet. I cannot emphasize enough how much potential harm comes from our society’s insistence that diet simply means restricting caloric intake to lose weight.

The current trend in maintaining a healthy weight is the non-diet approach for health, and although I say trend, it is more than just trendy.  It is not like the dozens of fad diets that have had brief popular appeal over the past fifty years that promise quick weight loss and often don’t deliver.

In my book—A Woman’s Guide to Healthy Aging- I look at some of the problems associated with our modern diet and consider some common-sense solutions that can help reduce your health risk for the long haul, I call this the non-diet diet.

The non-diet approach is a more balanced, realistic way to lose weight and maintain good health with nourishing foods, daily physical activity, positive thinking and smart life-style choices. This includes:

  • Making fibre your friend. Fibre keeps our digestive system running smoothly and also keeps us feeling full and satisfied longer.
  • Get cooking! Make healthier versions of your favorite take out—save time by buying pre-cut washed veggies.
  • Eat your fruit and veggies and your leafy greens
  • Boost vitamin B intake: Folate B12 and B6
  • Boost vitamin E intake
  • Add polyphenol-rich foods-brain foods that are powerful anti-oxidants: blackberries cherries plums, walnut halves
  • Reduce your fat intake
  • Increase your Omega 3-fatty acids
  • What your cholesterol
  • Get your daily calcium

Any way we look at it, regardless of our personal inclinations—whether we’re trim or we tip the scale, whether we live to run or we balk at running, whether we sleep like babies or get nothing better than a series of catnaps through the night—nutrition, exercise, and sleep are among the major factors that affect our health.

One very important thing to realize about these factors is that they are within our control.

Sure, other factors beyond our control also affect our health, including family history and genetic inheritance, sex, and age. We cannot modify those, but we can modify how we eat, how active we are, and how well we sleep. And for many of us, some modification is necessary if we want to live a long and healthy life.

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

Skin Cancer–Summertime and the Living is Easy. But Not for Skin Cancer

 

Don’t be fooled looking at celebrity photos of stars walking the beach in Malibu all bronzed and healthy. It gives the wrong impression that looking good means getting a good tan in the summer.

The truth.  Sun and skin cancer go hand in hand triggered by exposure to ultraviolet rays and artificial tanning beds. One in six Canadians born in Canada in the 1990’s will get skin cancer—the number one killer of women aged 25-30. Skin Cancer is the second most in common cancer in young adults aged 15-34 * (Canadian Skin Cancer Foundation)

As you head off to vacation or spend your days outside this summer the most important thing to remember is to use sun block. And lots of it. The most common mistake is not using enough.  Does it surprise you to learn that a family of four will use one bottle of sun block in just one day!

The Canadian Skin Cancer Foundation recommends that when you first apply sunscreen, it should form a film on your skin. The white streaks won’t last long; sunscreen absorbs quickly.

To protect your lips, use a lip balm or lipstick that contains sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Reapply sunscreen approximately every two hours, or after swimming or sweating, and according to the directions on the bottle.

Attention: parents of newborns.
Do not use sunscreen on babies under six months old. They are too small to absorb the chemicals and will be harmful.  The best way to protect your infant is to keep them out of the sun.

Although skin cancer is preventable and most often treatable, it remains the most common form of cancer.  So please protect yourself, your family and friends by passing this information on and practicing safe sun.

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Considerable efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discuss

Workplace Health- Keeping a workplace healthy is all about prevention

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Workplace health is all about prevention. When one person gets sick, it can have a domino effect.  Soon everyone has ‘that cold so and so gave me’.  So, prevention is now more important than ever because this is the first generation that will not live longer than its parents. With an aging population and an increase in chronic health problems like hypertension, diabetes, and obesity on the rise, employers need to act. We can’t help getting older, but we can make changes in our lifestyle and prevent many of these illnesses.

Leading causes of death are all preventable. The way things are going now, 44 per cent of the population will be living with diabetes or pre-diabetes by 2025. The cost of diabetes to the Canadian economy will increase 25 per cent in seven years. Obesity is a trigger for other diseases and is also becoming more prevalent.  It doesn’t matter what diet or fitness regime one follows, it’s adherence that will make a difference.  As a family physician and Vice-President of Medical Affairs at Medisys Corporate health that provides employee health and wellness services to individuals and companies, we have a three-step philosophy to tackle this health issues.

  • The first step is to assess – identify major concerns within the employee population and define key performance indicators (KPIs).
  • The second step is to monitor – a physician will interpret the results and then monitor employee’s health changes and progress over time. They will determine the key focus areas for employee health services to address the issues.
  • The final step is to improve – deliver measurable wellness outcomes and drive employee engagement and participation in wellness programming.

According to a report by the SHRM Foundation, “more than 75% of high-performing companies regularly measure health and wellness as a viable component of their overall risk management strategy.” A survey conducted by Towers Watson and the National Business Group on Health “found that 83% of companies have already revamped or expect to revamp their health care strategy within the next two years, up from 59% in 2009. This year, more employers (66%) plan to offer incentives for employees to complete a health risk appraisal, up from 61% in 2009.

And it’s working! The Public Health Agency of Canada reported that by implementing a physical activity program, Canada Life in Toronto improved productivity and reduced turnover and insurance costs while achieving a return on investment (ROI) of $6.85 per corporate dollar invested.

A win –win for everyone. A solid return on investment for the company and a healthier employee and individual.

Disclaimer
The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

Spring Cleaning – it’s Time to De-clutter Your Life!

shutterstock_335890811 (1)Spring cleaning is a time-honoured tradition of doing a deep clean of one’s home or a room.

In modern times, it’s also used as a metaphor for a time to reflect on our lives and look for ways to simplify or invigorate our lives. I look at it as a time to review expectations of yourself and others around you over the past year and whether you have been conscientious about saying NO and YES to yourself!

What that means is learning to make time for yourself. Setting time aside for exercise or reading a book or just relaxing, rather than meeting the expectations of others.

I know, it’s not easy with so many demands on our time these days between family, work and other obligations. It’s easy to put yourself and your needs last on the list. But here’s a strategy to consider, a way to prioritize the demands. Learn to say no. That’s right, say no.

No, I cannot take on more work, no I cannot accept that task, no we as a family cannot do more.

Here are three easy steps to learn:

  1. Open your month
  2. Say NO, thank you. It doesn’t work for me. Sorry, No
  3. Close your mouth. DON’T say “I’ll try” or “Maybe”. It is a clear, though polite, NO

And when you say No to something, you are, in reality,  also saying yes.
Yes to your health, Yes to your family, Yes to your life, Yes to a different priority.
Enjoy the YES and you have empowered yourself by saying NO.

So yes, spring cleaning and to de-cluttering and learning to say NO and appreciating the YES

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

 

Are your immunizations up to date? Immunize Canada wants you to #getvax

shutterstock_164560082 (1).jpgImmunize Canada wants to make sure you #getvax and celebrate a healthy tomorrow.

100 years ago, infectious diseases were the leading causes of deaths worldwide.  In Canada, they now cause lets than 5% of all deaths, thanks in part to immunization programs across the country.

However, diseases don’t go away.  They are held at bay through rigorous vaccination programmes.  But suddenly in recent years, we have seen a resurgence of mumps across the country especially in certain age groups, born between 1970-1994. While this age group was immunized, they generally received only one vaccine against mumps, and we now know two are necessary. There are also individuals arriving from other nations where there are limited immunization programs, and they may be at risk.

Immunization week in Canada is April 22-29.  We have a lot to celebrate.   Our country was at the forefront of vaccine and drug discoveries when Connaught Laboratories at the University of Toronto, became one of the first to produce large-scale quantities of insulin in 1922 and continued to be a major supplier of insulin into the 1980’s.  Connaught continues to be active in vaccine production and research. When the Ebola outbreak resurfaced in West Africa between 2013 until 2017, Canada and the US partnered to develop a pioneering drug to fight the deadly disease which left 28,000 people dead and 11,000 more infected.

Arguably the most significant develop in public health over the past hundred years has been the development of vaccines.  While our vaccination rate is high, we can be doing a better job of reaching all at-risk groups including refugee immigrants, the mentally ill and those who are suspicious about vaccinations. All adults over the age of 65 are considered at risk as our immune system weakens with age.

New app helps keep track-CANImmunize

It is now easier to keep track, thanks to Immunize Canada and a new app, CANImmunize.  It helps you keep up to date with your vaccinations.  It also provides the ability to manage your families’ immunization records with the use of their smartphones or mobile devices. It also includes automatic reminders to schedule routine vaccinations and access to timely and trusted information about recommended vaccinations for children, adults, and travelers.  Available in the App Store for iPhones & iPads.

So this week and throughout the year, help yourself, your family and others stay healthy, by keeping up to date with your vaccinations and remember to #getvax

Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes only. Great effort has been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting a competent person such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always, we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join the discussions.

Mumps are making a comeback in Canada

shutterstock_337150673Check your vaccinations!
A rise in cases of Mumps in Canada has public health officials asking young adults to check if they need a vaccination booster. The standard vaccination is two doses starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Teens and adults also should also be up to date on their MMR vaccination. *(measles, mumps & rubella)

Mumps is a viral infection that is contagious and spread through saliva and respiratory droplets, causing swelling of the salivary glands. **   Prior to having a vaccination against mumps available in the mid-sixties in Canada, mumps among school-age children was common in fact a rite of passage.   In early 1970’s the vaccine was combined to offer protection against measles, mumps. and rubella. (MMR).

But providing a second round of the vaccine wasn’t practiced until the 1990’s, which has led to a small gap in immunity for those born between 1970 and 1994.

The gap in immunity for those that have not had a second dose is one of the reasons, health officials believe there is a rise in the infection.  The other is because of growing numbers of individuals who have never been vaccinated for mumps and are infectious while coming into contact where are a lot of people sharing food and drinks. It takes between two to five days before the infection begins to show swelling and other symptoms. Once mumps has been diagnosed, the usual procedure is to keep the individual in isolation until the infection subsides.

The symptoms of mumps include fever, headache, fatigue, loss of appetite and inflammation and tenderness of one or both salivary glands

Mumps is serious and can have long term affects such as deafness, or sterility in males.

So, it is extremely important that you check your vaccination records with your family physician to ensure they are up to date.

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Mumps are making a comeback in Canada.Disclaimer

The material contained in this blog is for informational and educational purposes. Great efforts have been made to maintain the quality of the content.  However, it is strongly recommended that the treatment/management of any medical conditions mentioned here, should not be used by an individual/visitor of this blog, on their own, without consulting competent persons such as your doctor, or health care provider.   As always we encourage your comments on this blog or any others and hope you will join discussions.

 

Sources:  * Center for Disease Control  ** Wikipedia -Mumps

New Guidelines for Zika Virus & Travel

Zika Florida inforgraphic 1200x628Canada’s Public Health Agency issued a travel health notice recommending that pregnant women avoid traveling to countries or areas where the mosquito-borne Zika virus has been found which includes popular destinations for Canadians, including Cuba, Mexico, the Bahamas, and Jamaica.

http://https://www.facebook.com/CTVNewsChannel/videos/1325413534186641/